3 Ways to Find Love in 2013

01/03/2013

Fitness is a popular New Year's resolution, but people often overlook relationship goals, even though finding healthy relationships are integral to our overall well-being. The Google trend graph below demonstrates how fitness and relationship interests diverge around this time of year (the yellow representing "fitness goals," the blue representing "relationship goals" and the red representing "finding a boyfriend"):

Screen Shot 2013-01-03 at 6.09.21 PM

Regardless of whether your goals are fitness related or relationship oriented, people achieve less than half of their New Year's resolutions. However, researchers have found ways to greatly improve your chances of success by following these steps:

  1. Make smaller goals. For example, if you want to “find love” in the coming year, then think about setting up an online dating profile or just saying “hi” to the person you’ve been secretly admiring.
  2. Anticipate roadblocks. What are the excuses you might make that will stop you from setting up an online dating profile (I don’t have any good photos) or simply saying “hello” (He probably has a girlfriend, so why bother).
  3. Make the goal public. Sharing goals with a friend for encouragement (Helping you choose a great profile photo) and accountability (Do you actually know he has a girlfriend?) is a great way to improve your chances of success.

Whatever your goals are for the coming year, best of luck with achieving the physical and relational health goals you want!

More on Relationships:

How to Approach a Guy You're Interested In

Dating Do's and Don'ts

10 Ways to Tell If a Girl LIkes You


Ty Tashiro is the author of The Science of Happily Ever After: What Really Matters in the Quest for Enduring Love, an entertaining look at why modern dating is so challenging, why people can easily make bad partner choices, and how science can help us make smart decisions in the search for enduring love. It's available on Amazon, Indie Bound and Barnes & Noble. Dr. Ty received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota. His research has appeared in top academic journals and he has been an award-winning professor at the University of Maryland and University of Colorado. Follow him on facebook and twitter.
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