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Space

17 Nov

Rosetta's Final Conversation With Philae Is Heart-Meltingly Human

Before comet lander Philae went to sleep, it shared one last "conversation" with the Rosetta space probe. For two robotic spacecraft, the Twitter tête-à-tête was surprisingly human.

"Prior to falling silent, the lander was able to transmit all science data gathered during the First Science Sequence," Philae lander manager Stephan Ulamec said. "This machine performed magnificently under tough conditions, and we can be fully proud of the incredible scientific success Philae has delivered."

Don't mind us crying over here. Good night, sweet Philae. Perhaps we'll meet again one day when you come closer to the sun.

Everything You Thought You Knew about a Comet - Might Kill Us!

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14 Nov

A Panoramic Postcard From Rosetta

It's a postcard from 317 miles away as Rosetta's Philae lander sent back its first panoramic picture from the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

     Pia18879_first_comet_panoramic

If you missed it the first time around, be sure to catch "Landing on a Comet: Rosetta Mission" Sunday night at 10/9c on Science Channel.

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12 Nov

Watch Live: Rosetta Comet Landing

Watch live on NASA TV as Rosetta's Philae lander attempts to land on Comet 67P, the first time a man-made object will ever touch down on a comet.


Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

Tonight at 9/8c on Science Channel, don't miss 'Landing on a Comet: Rosetta Mission' as Space Week continues.

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11 Nov

What Would Happen If You Went Into Space Without A Spacesuit?

Happy Space Week!

During more than five months on the International Space Station, the men of Expedition 41 (who returned to Earth Sunday night) ventured outside the space station for several spacewalks. Each extra-vehicular activity was conducted while wearing specialized spacesuits that keep astronauts safe from the elements.

What would happen if a human body was exposed to space without a spacesuit? DNews investigates:

Space Week continues TONIGHT on Science Channel.

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10 Nov

Expedition 41 Astronauts Return to Earth (Just in Time for Space Week!)

It's Space Week on Science Channel and just in time, the astronauts of Expedition 41 returned safely to Earth Sunday after more than five months aboard the International Space Station.

The trio landed in Kazakhstan at 10:58 p.m. EST; Expedition 41 Commander Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency and Flight Engineers Reid Wiseman (NASA) and Alexander Gerst (European Space Agency) traveled more than 70 million miles during 165 days in space.

Among the men's most memorable moments from the ISS: Wiseman sent the first Vine video from space and later engaged in a friendly wager when Germany faced the United States in the World Cup.

Welcome home!

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5 Nov

The First Music Video Ever Shot In Space Is Back On YouTube

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield became a social media superstar during his time aboard the International Space Station, regularly sending Tweets and videos from the space station to Earth after arriving on the ISS in December 2012

One of his most popular videos was a cover of David Bowie's "Space Oddity." The video racked up millions of views before the song's licensing agreement expired, and it was pulled from YouTube in May 2014.

Now, six months later, "Space Oddity" (live from space!) is back. In an announcement posted to his blog, Hadfield wrote that "we are so happy to be able to announce that my on-orbit cover of Space Oddity is back up on YouTube."

"This time we have a new 2-year agreement, and it is there, for free, for everyone. We’re proud to have helped bring Bowie’s genius from 1969 into space itself in 2013, and now ever-forward. Special thanks to Onward Music Ltd, to the Canadian Space Agency and NASA, to musicians Emm Gryner and Joe Corcoran, to videographer Andrew Tidby, to my son Evan, and mostly to Mr. David Bowie himself. For the countless others who have helped work to bring about a new era of exploration, the art of it sings to us all."

WATCH:

Hadfield frequently shared snippets of daily life in space, from how astronauts sleep to how to cook a space burrito.

Here, he demonstrates what happens when you wring a wet washcloth in space:

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14 Oct

Sun Looks Like A Jack-O'-Lantern In New NASA Photo

Just in time for Halloween, a new photo from NASA reveals a spooky sight in the sky: a jack-o'-lantern face on the sun.

NASA explains:

"The active regions appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy — markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona."

NASAHalloweenSun

Tonight on 'The Unexplained Files,' learn about an unexplained solar phenomenon spotted in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Some say it's a religious miracle, others believe it has a supernatural element. What do you think?

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13 Oct

Here's What Last Week's Lunar Eclipse Looked Like From Mercury (VIDEO)

The October 8 total lunar eclipse and "blood moon" were stunning from Earth but if you're curious what the event looked like from space, wonder no more.

Composed of 31 images taken two minutes apart between 5:18 a.m. to 6:18 a.m. by NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft, this animation shows the view from Mercury as the moon slowly faded from view.

"From Mercury, the Earth and Moon normally appear as if they were two very bright stars," planetary scientist Hari Nair said. "During a lunar eclipse, the Moon seems to disappear during its passage through the Earth's shadow, as shown in the movie."

Learn more about Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system:

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24 Sep

Should Pluto Be A Planet Again?

Pluto was downgraded to a 'dwarf planet' in 2006 but a recent debate hosted by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics stirred up old passions and led to a vote that overwhelmingly favored reinstating Pluto as a planet.

As Astrobiology Magazine reports:

"[Science historian Dr. Owen] Gingerich argued that “a planet is a culturally defined word that changes over time,” and that Pluto is a planet. [Dr. Gareth] Williams defended the IAU definition, which declares that Pluto is not a planet. And [Dr. Dimitar] Sasselov defined a planet as “the smallest spherical lump of matter that formed around stars or stellar remnants,” which means Pluto is a planet.

After these experts made their best case, the audience got to vote on what a planet is or isn’t and whether Pluto is in or out. The results are in, with no hanging chads in sight. 

According to the audience, Sasselov’s definition won the day, and Pluto IS a planet."

Back in 2006, Bill Nye supported changing Pluto's name to a dwarf planet; after this week's debate and vote, he told The Huffington Post that "I love Pluto as much as the next guy, but it has a different origin from the traditional planets and orbits in a different plane. It might be exciting to have names for hundreds of new (very old) planets, but I would be fine with 8 'traditionals' and hundreds of 'Plutoids.'"

You can watch the debate and come to your own conclusions on YouTube.

Poor pitiful Pluto...

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18 Sep

NASA Finds 'Big Surprise In Teeny Tiny Galaxy' (PHOTO)

The Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a supermassive black hole inside a "teeny tiny" galaxy, which "crams 140 million stars within a diameter of about 300 light-years, which is only 1/500th of our galaxy’s diameter."

"It’s very much like a pinprick in the sky," astronomer Anil Seth said, while NASA's press release revealed that this ultra-compact galaxy has an incredibly dense and dazzling night sky:

"If you lived inside this dwarf galaxy, the night sky would dazzle with at least 1 million stars visible to the naked eye. Our nighttime sky as seen from Earth’s surface shows 4,000 stars."

An artist's rendering of the M60-UCD1 Black Hole -- captioned "Our Hubble Space Telescope finds big surprise in teeny tiny galaxy" -- shows the astounding scale:

Did A Black Hole Create The Milky Way?

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Welcome to the inSCIder, where you can connect with the people who bring Science Channel to life. Find out what's in the works here at SCIENCE, share your feedback with the team and see what's getting our attention online and in the news.

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