Science Channel - InSCIder

23 Mar

This Week in Science! March 19th to March 23rd

Supreme Pizza CREDIT Scott Bauer-Agricultural Research ServiceHow the Smell of Food Affects How Much You Eat—Bite size depends on the familiarly and texture of food. Smaller bite sizes are taken for foods which need more chewing and smaller bite sizes are often linked to a sensation of feeling fuller sooner. New research published in BioMed Central's new open access journal Flavour, shows that strong aromas lead to smaller bite sizes and suggests that aroma may be used as a means to control portion size. [Link]

Scientists Wrest Partial Control of a Memory—Scripps Research Institute scientists and their colleagues have successfully harnessed neurons in mouse brains, allowing them to at least partially control a specific memory. Though just an initial step, the researchers hope such work will eventually lead to better understanding of how memories form in the brain, and possibly even to ways to weaken harmful thoughts for those with conditions such as schizophrenia and post traumatic stress disorder. [Link]

Trees May Play Role in Electrifying the Atmosphere, Study Suggests—Plants have long been known as the lungs of the Earth, but a new finding has found they may also play a role in electrifying the atmosphere. [Link]

Runner's High Motivated the Evolution of Exercise, Research Suggests—In the last century something unexpected happened: humans became sedentary. We traded in our active lifestyles for a more immobile existence. But these were not the conditions under which we evolved. David Raichlen from the University of Arizona, USA, explains that our hunter-gatherer predecessors were long-distance endurance athletes. 'Aerobic activity has played a role in the evolution of lots of different systems in the human body, which may explain why aerobic exercise seems to be so good for us', says Raichlen. However, he points out that testing the hypothesis that we evolved for high-endurance performance is problematic, because most other mammalian endurance athletes are quadrupedal. [Link]

Implanted Biofuel Cell Operating in Living Snail—Researchers led by Evgeny Katz, the Milton Kerker Chaired Professor of Colloid Science at Clarkson University, have implanted a biofuel cell in a living snail. [Link]

Live Cells 'Printed' Using Standard Inkjet Printer—Researchers from Clemson University have found a way to create temporary holes in the membranes of live cells using a standard inkjet printer. [Link]

Deprived of Sex, Jilted Flies Drink More Alcohol—Sexually deprived male fruit flies exhibit a pattern of behavior that seems ripped from the pages of a sad-sack Raymond Carver story: when female fruit flies reject their sexual advances, the males are driven to excessive alcohol consumption, drinking far more than comparable, sexually satisfied male flies. [Link]

Biplane to Break the Sound Barrier: Cheaper, Quieter and Fuel-Efficient Biplanes Could Put Supersonic Travel On the Horizon—Cheaper, quieter and fuel-efficient biplanes could put supersonic travel on the horizon. [Link]

Scientists Develop Tools to Make More Complex Biological Machines from Yeast—Scientists are one step closer to making more complex microscopic biological machines, following improvements in the way that they can "re-wire" DNA in yeast, according to research recently published in the journal PLoS ONE. [Link]

Exercise Can Lead to Female Orgasm, Sexual Pleasure—Findings from a first-of-its-kind study by Indiana University researchers confirm anecdotal evidence that exercise -- absent sex or fantasies -- can lead to female orgasm. [Link]

People With Autism Possess Greater Ability to Process Information, Study Suggests—People with autism have a greater than normal capacity for processing information even from rapid presentations and are better able to detect information defined as 'critical', according to a study published March 22 in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. The research may help to explain the apparently higher than average prevalence of people with autism spectrum disorders in the IT industry. [Link]

Ryan Wheaton
Production Assistant
SCIENCE

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